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There is no defined “golden path” and every Sailor’s career differs based on personal and professional goals, family considerations and timing. 1. Mechanisms to rapidly develop, test, and field innovative approaches to address the expanding threat spectrum: This issue is particularly relevant in the.
 
 

 

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For starters turn off lights in jons spaces, unplug unused electronics and report energy and water waste to your building energy monitor or your Building Maintenance Representative. If his task is to deny the base, адрес страницы force may be relatively weak and largely concentrated in, or prepared to move into, an area which is easy to defend. Foggo spoke from the Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial where the University of Cambridge donated more than 30 acres of land to honor the fallen in

 
 

– Landing Operations Doctrine, USN, FTP

 
 

Five medical students, obsessed by what lies beyond the confines of life, embark on a daring experiment: by stopping their hearts for short periods, each triggers a near-death experience — giving them a firsthand account of the afterlife. Life for a single mom in Los Angeles takes an unexpected turn when she al-.

A group of bullied kids with troubled family lives, band together when a monster, taking the appearance of a clown, begins hunting children. These two elite secret organizations must band together to defeat a common enemy. Franco and Michael Pea. R, Drama-Horror, min. Madea, Bam, and Hattie venture to a haunted campground and the group must run for their lives when monsters, goblins, and the boogeyman are unleashed. If you have been sexually assaulted or need to speak with a S.

The DoD Safe Helpline can be reached toll-free at The schedule is: Sabbath School lessons, to a. For details call Paolo Fleurant at or email naplesadventistsgroup yahoo. Connect the Tots is an organization for bringing together families with babies and toddlers to play and mingle.

Monthly club events include themed parties, group outings off-base and playground meet-ups. Training and support provided. For details email naplesgs yahoo. Child care provided. We also meet Wednesdays at a. For details email cwocnaples gmail. For details email michael. For details email Dana Eberlin at kofcnaples gmail. Register For On-Site Undergraduate Classes Visit the colleges for more information about what classes and programs are offered. The Naples Christian Homeschool Association meets every month to support families who have chosen to educate their own children.

The U. Courses meet in a series of four evenings and one weekend. Meditation Sitting Group meets on Mondays from to 6 p. Participation is free and newcomers are welcome. For details or questions please email Claudia at Naplesmeditationgroup gmail. The CPGA provides weekly social activities for all levels of golfer and often organize trips to other courses.

Events are held every Saturday and Sunday. For details call Naples Area Nurses Association NANA is an organization of nurses that work together to fundraise, participate in social events, and provide support throughout the U. For details email Lt. Shelley Beltz at shelley. Jenny Paul at jenny. For eligible children who have not reached their third birthday. Security Note: All DoD military or civilian personnel hosting an event off base must complete a Special Event Force Protection Plan SEFPP 45 days in advance, regardless of organization, if the event will involve 50 or more personnel, include distinguished visitors or involve personnel wearing uniforms.

Cub Scout Pack Does your son enjoy being outdoors, going on hikes, swimming and camping? The Naples Cub Scouts is an active program that is open to boys between kindergarten and fifth grade.

Meetings and activities are three times per month. For details email naplescubmaster gmail. Driving may not be the cheapest means of travel You may find that it is cheaper, faster, and easier to take a train. In Europe, tolls are frequently more expensive than in the United States, as a trip from Naples to Florence is roughly 70 euro round trip plus fuel costs. A good reference for determining the cost of a drive is the Michelin route planner,. Cities like Paris and London have multiple airports, and you may find it cheaper to book a separate return ticket from a different airport on a different carrier.

Websites like flights. Just make sure to read the fine print regarding carry-on luggage, as each airlines have different rules, with some. A cheap flight does not necessarily mean cheap destination Many of the budget airlines operate out of the smaller airports, often at greater distances from the city center. You may easily be looking at a euro cab or hour-long train ride at rush hour.

Public transportation is often more affordable, but often lacks space to accommodate large bags. A great trick is to call your hotel ahead of time and see if they offer a shuttle, or partner with a driver that does routine airport pickup. They may offer a reduced fare compared to what you will find through Uber or online, and their driver will already know where the hotel is located.

What about tickets? Going to popular destinations often means you need a ticket to visit a trendy location. Some tickets, for example the Warner Bros. Studio Harry Potter tour in London, are only sold ahead of time online. Others, like the Eifel tower in Paris sell some reserve tickets online with the remainder on location.

To avoid disappointment, look up each of your destinations and see what you can purchase ahead of time. Unfortunately, if you are booking last minute, these types of tickets may be your only remaining option. Set expectations for the trip with the entire family. Taking a family to Paris can be a delight, but while you may plan to see the Eifel tower, your spouse may want to make it a day at the Louvre museum, while your kids are hoping to spend time at Disney World. Often these destinations are far apart and time is limited to make everyone happy.

Setting your expectations for the trip early helps ensure everyone has a good time. Make an itinerary Time is a limited resource and should be budgeted just like money. Make sure you write it down, blocking out time for each event. Have a plan as to which events can be interchanged in case weather or unforeseen events require you to adjust your plans.

Know your budget This seems simple, but with the currency exchange it is easy to think that there is little difference between dollars, euro and pounds. That can be a costly mistake, so make sure you know the exchange rate when you travel. Paying for your transportation and hotels up front helps, but remember to budget your food expense.

A good estimate for a food budget is to consider your families normal budget when eating out for dinner and multiply that by at least three. In this situation, it is better to budget too much money than not enough.

On the bright side, any money not used for food can be allocated toward souvenirs, events or future trips. Stay flexible Things beyond our control always tend happen that will ruin even the best of plans, such as flight delays, bad weather or lack of tickets.

Just have an alternate plan and make the most of it. In my experience, talking with. Can you hear it? In the background is the ever-revolving London Eye. On August 21, , a week after this photo was taken, the famed clock chimed for the last time at noon. It will remain silent for major repair work, which is expected to last until Photo by Joe Luthy. There is nothing wrong with being friendly to your driver and asking for a brief windshield tour as they drive you around their city, as most look forward to showing it off.

Just remember operational security OPSEC , as the goal is for them to share with you, not so much you with them. Travel as light as possible and bring only what you really need. This will save you money in transportation costs, and protects you while out in town. Security is extremely tight everywhere, and when you go into a museum, or any major destination, your bags will be searched.

For instance, the leaning tower in Pisa requires you to check your bag in a locker, while the Eifel tower in Paris requires your bag to be emptied in front of them. Bringing less will save your back and will help you get through security so much faster. Keep in mind that all this planning takes a lot of work and is not for the faint of heart.

If you are just looking for a push button solution, where all you need to do is pack your bags and show up at the airport, you should contact the friendly representatives at either the USO or MWR. Both organizations plan multiple extended trips throughout many of the popular European destinations.

These trips are planned and booked months in advance, so contact them early as trips fill up fast. The most important thing to remember is that you should be enjoying your time in Europe and absorbing as much of the culture as possible. Bon voyage! Customer service operation hours for the following services are Monday, Wednesday and Friday from a.

Once registered, you may customize your job searches, set up job alerts and store your resume and other essential employment documents online and be ready to apply for a job anytime.

The customer service hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 8 a. The announcements are also. The CHR Office must receive mailed applications by closing date of the vacancy announcement. Any prior editions will be obsolete and will no longer be considered beginning January 1, Applications that do not conform to the revised instructions will not be considered. If you have any questions, contact the front desk at DSN or Comm. You will be contacted within 24 hours, so please be sure to provide your contact information.

Thank you and we appreciate your input, whether negative or positive so that we can find ways to improve the CHR services, or. Please feel free to come by, pick up a copy of a vacancy announcement that you may be interested in applying for, or ask questions. The applications may be emailed to NAFPersonnel eu. Job summary: Performs tasks with several steps or sequence of tasks such as: sets up food service counters, steam tables, dining room tables, and side service stands with hot and cold food, including meats, vegetables, salads, desserts, bread, butter and beverages.

Open until filled. Tasks consist of several steps that require attention to work operations and follow and established sequence of work. These tasks, which are summarized into categories related to food preparation and service, kitchen maintenance, and food storage.

Closing date: December 31, Job summary: Main duty will be to provide oversight of activities and necessary services to authorized patrons, including general information on the use of equipment. Provide information concerning facilities and operation. Job Summary: Serves as a primary front line customer service representative of the overall program as such, must continually present information in a high professional and customer friendly style.

Job summary: Provides appropriate developmental care and instruction for children and youth ranging in age from six weeks to 18 years in a Child and Youth Program setting Performs routine, day-to-day care of infants and children ranging from six weeks to five years.

Closing date: September 30, Closing date: November 3, Closing date: October 27, NEX U. For a current list of U. You will see all the jobs in Italy mostly Naples area ; just make sure you are NOT applying for a position located in Sigonella Sicily. For any questions or concerns please call the numbers above. Job summary: Sells general merchandise to customers exercising professional selling techniques. Works as part of a sales team to provide service that anticipates and exceeds customer expectations.

Job summary: Responsible for selling general merchandise to customers and ensuring merchandise is properly stocked and available. Candidates must be at least 18 years old to apply. The contract will begin in December For details email Chaplain Dietz at peter. For this reason, if a supporting base is not available to the attacker, it may be advisable to restrict preliminary air operations of carrier-based planes to necessary reconnaissance, in order to insure superiority at the critical time of landing.

The naval defense forces of a base, having the mission of furnishing information of the attacker’s movements and inflicting damage to his ships and small boats transporting troops to the beach, must be cleared from the sea areas required for the conduct of the operation, or effectively neutralized during the course of the landing.

In addition to screening and patrolling the station and maneuver areas of the attacking force during the landing, advance forces may be given the task of operating against the naval defense force prior to the landing with the view of clearing the required area of surface patrol craft and reducing the number and effectiveness of enemy submarines.

At night, patrol vessels constitute one of the defender’s principal means of securing information as to the movements of the attacker’s ships. To secure this information, they have to approach closely and attempt to identify every vessel maneuvering on the coast.

For this reason, destroyers of the attacker operating at night against naval defense forces have an excellent opportunity of making contacts with enemy vessels and locating their patrol areas. Operations in such areas for several nights prior to the landing should result in material losses to the naval defense force and reduction in its effectiveness by compelling the enemy vessels to adopt a less aggressive attitude.

The composition of advance forces will depend upon the tasks assigned and the probable enemy forces in the theater of operations. Advance forces should be dispatched at such time as will permit the main operation to be executed without unnecessary delay. Specially trained marine personnel and suitable boats for reconnaissance tasks should accompany the force for the conduct of necessary shore reconnaissances.

When the advance force is given the task of securing a supporting base, a suitable landing force should be made a part of the advance force, or available to it, for use when the occasion arises. Types of operations 7 The main landing 8 Secondary landings 8 Demonstrations 8 Surprise landings 9. Types of operations. The main landing; One or more secondary landings; and One or more demonstrations or feints. The main landing. In the assignment of troops, ships, and aircraft, it has first consideration and must be provided with the forces necessary for success.

The detachment of any forces from the main landing for the conduct of a subsidiary operation is only justified when the results to be reasonably expected from the latter are greater than if these forces were used in the main landing.

In some situations, consideration should be given to making two or more landings in force, with the view to exploiting the landing which is most successful. Secondary landings are those made outside the immediate area of the main landing which directly or indirectly support the main landing.

They may be made prior to, simultaneously with, or subsequent to, the main landing. Secondary landings are usually made for the purpose of seizing and holding areas which are desirable for operations in connection with the main landing, or which may be used by the enemy in opposing the main landing. Secondary landings may also be made for the purpose of diverting enemy reserves, artillery fire, or aircraft support from the area of the main landing. Such landings may also cause delay in starting the movement of the general reserves, or local defense forces from other sectors, to oppose the main landing.

The early entry into action of land-based artillery and aircraft may be necessary in order to provide adequate support for the main landing or the operations on shore. Where suitable areas for landing fields or artillery positions exist outside of the area of the main landing, consideration should be given to the early seizure of such areas by secondary landings. Secondary landings made for the purpose of causing the movement of hostile reserves from the main landing area require, as a rule, a greater proportional force than those seeking to hold enemy forces in place or retard their movement.

In the former case, sufficient force must be employed to overcome the local defense forces and gain a success which threatens a point important to the defender; otherwise, he probably will not move his reserves. The term “secondary landings” should not be used in plans and orders, as these landings constitute an important part of the operation as a whole.

The forces assigned these tasks must carry them out with the same determination that characterizes the main landing. In some situations, the development of the subsequent operations may make it advisable to exploit a secondary landing rather than the main landing, consequently this should be considered when selecting areas for secondary landings. A demonstration, or feint, is an exhibition of force, or movement, indicating an attack.

Demonstrations are made for the purpose of diverting enemy reserves, artillery fire, surface craft, submarines, or aircraft support from the area of the main landing, or the retarding of the movement of enemy forces thereto.

In order further to deceive the enemy as to the location of the main landing, demonstrations may be conducted and coordinated with secondary landings. A demonstration alone, however, may often be more effective than a weak secondary landing, particularly in delaying the movement of enemy forces toward the area of the main effort.

The effectiveness of a weak landing is largely lost as soon as its weakness is discovered, while a show of force constitutes a continuing threat and may hold in place comparatively large enemy forces for considerable periods of time. In order to produce the greatest effect, the mobility of ships should be utilized in such operations to threaten a number of points and thus immobilize enemy forces over a large area. Demonstrations have no territorial objective but they should threaten areas of importance to the enemy.

They should be coordinated as to time, and directed at points so distant from the main landing that they will contain the enemy forces stationed at or drawn to such points, and prevent them from opposing the main landing. This coordination as to time and distance is particularly important where it is desired to prevent the participation of the enemy aircraft, surface vessels, and submarines in the operations involved in the main landing. Demonstrations conducted in conjunction with and in the vicinity of an actual landing are effective in causing a dispersion of enemy artillery fire.

Shore batteries generally have a “normal zone” covering one or more beaches and a “contingent zone” covering other beaches or areas. The defensive artillery plan will generally provide for a concentration of all batteries within range of a designated point. A few boats approaching a beach, particularly when accompanied by smoke and some gunfire, should make all enemy batteries, within whose normal zone the beach lies, open fire on that particular beach or boats, rather than joining in a general concentration on the actual landing.

Such demonstrations are particularly desirable when the main landing is conducted on a comparatively narrow front. Demonstrations may be conducted in connection with reconnaissance prior to a landing in order to cause the consumption of the enemy ammunition and chemical supplies, the disclosure.

From the foregoing, it may be seen that demonstrations or feints may be made to contribute greatly toward the gaining of tactical surprise. Surprise landings. These landings may be in connection with or part of the main or secondary landings and should be made in accordance with the same principles and for the same purposes as previously set forth in this section. The beachhead 9 The force beachhead line 9 The exploitation line 9 Extent and form of the beachhead 9 Successive objectives 10 The artillery control line 10 Intermediate beachhead lines 10 Establishing the beachhead 10 Advance from the beachhead The establishment of a beachhead enables a commander to maintain control of his forces until the situation ashore has developed and he has sufficient information on which to base his plans and orders for further operations.

As a matter of security, it will be necessary to clear the beachhead of enemy resistance. It should be kept in mind, however, that the establishment of a beachhead is not a purely defensive measure. It has the equally important object of insuring further advance inland if required to accomplish the mission of the force. Consideration should be given, therefore, to the early seizure of terrain features which will facilitate this advance by including them in the beachhead or making them the objective of a special operation.

Consideration should also be given to depriving the enemy of terrain features which are most advantageous in the defense. The force beachhead line.

It is not necessarily a defensive position to be occupied and organized as such. It is, however, a tentative main line of resistance in case of counterattack prior to the advance from the beachhead, and it is occupied and organized to the extent demanded by the situation. See fig. This is a line beyond the beachhead line to which reconnaissance and security detachments will be pushed by units occupying the beachhead line.

It provides a zone in which active reconnoitering will be conducted on the initiative of such unit commanders and, at the same time, prevents a greater dispersion of the force as a whole than is desired by the force commander. Reconnaissances beyond the exploitation line will partake of the nature of reconnaissances in force launched by specific orders against designated points or in designated directions. In the event of the occupation of the beachhead line as a defensive position, the exploitation line constitutes the limit of the outpost positions.

The beachhead should be of sufficient depth and frontage to secure the landing from ground-observed artillery fire. Usually this will be possible only with comparatively large forces. A landing force manifestly cannot overextend its units or subject its flanks, beach establishments, and land communications to attack until the enemy situation has been developed. The depth and frontage of the beachhead will be dependent, therefore, upon the mission, the size of the force engaged, the nature of the terrain particularly as regards natural obstacles, and the probable enemy reaction.

Figure 2 shows diagrammatically how terrain features may modify the form of the beachhead, and the extent to which the beachhead line may have to be occupied under various.

In figure 2-a, the terrain is assumed to be suitable for maneuver throughout its whole extent. In figures 2-b and 2-c, the effect is shown of certain impassable obstacles, which may be encountered in a variety of forms and combinations. Figure 2-d shows a beachhead where it is necessary to land in a town.

This latter situation might arise in the seizure of a town as part of a major operation or in connection with a small war where a beachhead, in addition to its normal functions, would afford an immediate security zone for civilians.

In most situations of this kind it would be advisable to land outside the town even though only very weak resistance is anticipated. Successive objectives. Such objectives have the advantages of permitting reorganization of attacking troops, passage of lines, coordination of field artillery and ships’ gunfire with the advance, and facilitating the execution of an appreciable change in direction of the attack. Objectives entail a certain delay and should not be prescribed unless actually needed for a definite purpose.

This is a line short of which the field artillery does not fire except on request of infantry commanders, and beyond which the advance is supported by the bulk of the field artillery. Its introduction is often desirable in order to permit artillery to open fire immediately upon landing without danger to friendly troops.

The position of the artillery control line is fixed after consideration of the probable position of the infantry at the time the artillery is ashore and in position to open fire. If suitable terrain features exist, the artillery control line should be located a safe distance beyond an infantry objective, which can easily be defined and readily identified on the ground by both infantry and artillery.

If no such natural features exist, the artillery control line should be located at such distance from the beach that the advanced infantry elements will not, in all probability, have reached the target area at the time it is estimated that the artillery will open fire.

Main reliance must be placed in ships’ gunfire for support of the attack up to the artillery control line, as field artillery will not be in position to fire short of this line unless the attack is stopped or materially slowed down before the artillery control line is reached. Subordinate commanders may find it desirable, particularly where beaches are not contiguous, to designate intermediate beachhead lines in addition to the successive objectives prescribed by higher authority, with the view of protecting the beaches from aimed small-arms fire.

The depth of such intermediate beachheads will be largely dependent upon the formation of the terrain adjacent to the beach. If there is a bluff or ridge close to the shore line, a comparatively shallow intermediate beachhead may suffice; if the terrain inland from the beach is an open, fairly uniform slope, an intermediate beachhead of from 1, to 1, yards may be necessary to accomplish the desired purpose.

When intermediate beachheads are prescribed, they are designated “Battalion beachhead,” “Regimental beachhead,” etc. In a landing operation, troops must clear the beach rapidly; there must be no delay at the water’s edge.

This requires, in the first place, that leading units be landed in assault formation as fully deployed as the available boats permit. Once landed, every individual must thoroughly understand that he must first clear the beach and then move rapidly inland or in the designated direction. Assault units push the attack to their designated objectives without waiting for the advance of units on their flanks.

Reserves are utilized to cover the flanks of advanced units rather than holding up the attack for a uniform advance on the whole front. If a unit is landed on the wrong beach, its commander will initiate such action as will best further the general scheme of maneuver.

The desirability of establishing a security zone around his shore base should not lead a commander to adopt a passive attitude. Unless the mission is accomplished by the securing and holding of the beachhead, active, aggressive action provides the surest means of carrying out the mission and will often afford the best protection to the beach establishments.

The advance from the beachhead line, however, may entail the breaking of one or both flanks from physical contact with the shore, the establishment of shore lines of communication, and entering into a phase of war of maneuver. Under such conditions, the securing of a beachhead may be followed by a period of stabilization during which the necessary regrouping of forces may be effected and information of the hostile dispositions secured.

Reconnaissances by air forces and ground troops should be pushed vigorously so that the delay on the beachhead line may be reduced to the absolute minimum.

The landing area 12 Mission 12 Enemy dispositions 12 Beaches 12 Suitability of terrain for shore operations 13 Station and maneuver areas for naval forces 13 Configuration of the coast line 14 Time element 14 Weather conditions 14 Final selection of landing area The landing area.

Its selection is governed by the following principal factors:. Enemy dispositions. Number and types of beaches and approaches thereto. Suitability of terrain for shore operations including the establishment of the beachhead and contemplated advance therefrom. Station and maneuver areas for naval vessels. Configuration of the coast line. Time element. Weather conditions. A landing area in which the defender has been able to occupy and strongly organize the available beaches should be avoided if it is possible to carry out the mission by landing at beaches undefended or less strongly held.

Where the defender is organized in depth, with natural obstacles and other means of defense, the successful conduct of a landing operation will require an enormous expenditure of ammunition, far beyond that ordinarily supplied to combat vessels. Such an operation should never be undertaken unless sufficient ships, planes, and ammunition are available effectively to neutralize the enemy weapons. The probable location of enemy general or local reserves, and the facility and speed with which these reserves can be thrown into action to oppose the landing or the advance inland, are important elements in the selection of a landing area.

Consideration should be given, therefore, to the routes and means of communications available for these reserves to the various landing areas, the possibility of the attacker interfering with their movement by air attack and interdiction fires, and the presence of terrain features, such as defiles and natural obstacles, favorable to employment of these reserves in opposing the advance.

A beach is that portion of the shore line normally required for the landing of a force approximating one infantry assault battalion. It may be, however, a portion of the shore line constituting a tactical locality, such as a bay, to which may be assigned a force larger or smaller than a battalion. Favorable beaches, from a physical standpoint, are those which permit the beaching of small boats close to the shore line and the rapid disembarking and movement inland of troops and equipment without undue interference from weather conditions or navigational difficulties.

Open beaches on the weather side where surf is breaking, or is likely to break during the course of the operation, are especially unfavorable, particularly where there are rocks or coral, unless landing boats especially designed to cross these obstacles are available.

The landing of a large force with its impedimenta may extend over several days, and this, together with the necessity of maintaining lines of supply, requires that certain beaches provide suitable conditions for continuous landings throughout the operation. Gently shelving beaches, or those having offshore reefs, causing small boats to ground at a considerable distance from the shore line, are unfavorable, as the time of disembarking and deploying is lengthened, with consequent increase in the effect of hostile fire.

The use of shallow draft lifeboats or rubber boats will be found advantageous when, because of tactical considerations or hydrographic conditions elsewhere, a landing on this type of beach is desired. Approaches to the beach should be free, under all conditions of tide, from natural or artificial obstructions to navigation, and it is particularly desirable that there be sufficient room to seaward to permit the boats to deploy into their attack formations before coming under effective artillery or small-arms fire.

Narrow entrances between islands and channels in reefs prevent this early deployment and greatly increase the effectiveness of the defender’s fire. Some of the beaches must provide suitable landing conditions and routes inland for wheeled vehicles and tractors. Such beaches may be captured initially or in subsequent operations. Other beaches may be suitable for landing infantry and pack artillery only.

In this connection, it should be recognized that determined foot troops can negotiate precipitous slopes and that such slopes will often offer dead spaces from enemy fires. Landing conditions at the foot of rocky cliffs, however, are often bad and landings may be possible only in calm seas. The area around a beach in which the defender can place weapons for direct aimed fire on the beach will be limited by the configuration of the ground. When such areas have a depth of several hundred yards, the immediate landing is more difficult because of the large zone which has to be neutralized.

Shallow areas are advantageous in reducing the size of this zone and permitting the attacker to deprive the defender of observation on the beach after a relatively short advance.

Woods which the defender has not had time to clear, or a bluff close to the beach, have certain definite advantages in executing the actual landing, provided the advance of necessary combat equipment is not seriously impeded. Such features may, however, render more difficult the support by naval gunfire of the subsequent advance inland. The number of beaches required for an operation is dependent upon the size of the attacking force, the scheme of maneuver, and the amount of resistance expected.

A landing area with a large number of suitable beaches is particularly desirable, even for a comparatively small force, as it causes a dispersion of the defender’s efforts and permits the attacker to land on as broad a front as is commensurate with his strength.

Such an area also favors tactical surprise, as it offers the attacker a choice in the selection of beaches, and the defender is unable to determine the exact point of landing until the boats have approached close to the shore. The shore line need not be suitable for landing throughout its entire extent, provided the various beaches permit the units landing thereon to be mutually supporting and a portion of the beaches permit the timely landing of the required equipment.

Beaches not otherwise suitable may be utilized for landing troops in rubber boats, amphibian tractors, or other special type boats. Such special equipment should be utilized to the fullest extent practicable for the execution of surprise landings, and to assist main landings by pressure at points which, because of the nature of the coast line, are lightly held by the enemy. The influence of the terrain on the shore operations is the same as in ordinary land warfare.

The proposed zone of advance should be critically examined as to its suitability for the contemplated operations, paying particular attention to the road net, natural obstacles or defiles which have to be forced, observation for both defender and attacker, maneuver room for the force engaged, and landing fields which permit the early entry into action of our land-based aircraft.

In connection with the location of the landing area in relation to the final objective of the shore operations, consideration should be given to the advantages inherent in a movement along the coast line. The sea affords protection to at least one flank, and such a movement greatly facilitates the supply problem in that the shore base may be shifted as the action progresses, resulting in shorter and more easily protected lines of supply.

This type of operation also compels the defender to fight on lines perpendicular to the beach and permits reinforcement of field artillery by ships’ guns firing under the most advantageous conditions. Too much reliance, however, should not be placed on this support except in areas adjacent to the beach and visible from seaward.

The naval forces should have station and maneuver areas free from mines and obstructions, and with suitable approaches thereto, in which troops may be safely disembarked and from which the type of fire demanded by the situation may be delivered.

The areas must be conveniently located with respect to the available beaches. Water deep enough for maneuvering vessels close inshore is desirable, as it enables ships accompanying the boats to stand well in and deliver their fire at short range. This permits the most effective support during the approach of the small boats and the initial landing.

Flanking fire in support of a landing is generally more effective than that delivered from the front, as it tends to enfilade the defender’s position and permits small boats carrying troops.

Sea areas from which this type of fire can be delivered are, therefore, extremely desirable. A sheltered transport area will materially decrease the time required for unloading troops and equipment and will lessen the danger of the operation being interrupted by bad weather. Water with a depth and bottom suitable for anchoring marking ships or buoys is a desirable feature. It may be advantageous in some cases to anchor transports or even firing ships.

Water of less than 10 fathoms furnishes considerable protection against large submarines, provided the shallow depth extends far enough to keep enemy submarines outside of maximum torpedo range. This depth of water, however, does not furnish complete protection from small submarines, and is favorable for enemy mining operations.

If a convenient supporting base is not available for anchorage and protection of the naval forces during the period elapsing between the initial landing and the securing of a suitable new base, it is highly desirable that the landing and operations ashore be planned with a view to securing a sheltered anchorage as quickly as possible. Favorable landing conditions are usually found in harbors, bays, and indentations in the coast line. Such formations, however, favor the concentration of enemy artillery fire in the entrances and, furthermore, permit the defender to bring flanking fire upon the boats from automatic weapons and antiboat guns from the shores flanking the entrance.

Enemy weapons so located must be neutralized by either naval gunfire or the leading element of the landing force before the boats making the main landing come within effective range of such flanking fire. Land projections are favorable to the attacker in that they facilitate the delivery of flanking fire by ships’ guns and permit the attacking units to protect both flanks by resting them on the water’s edge.

At the same time, the base of a peninsula may afford the enemy a strong defensive position which will block progress inland. The seizure of such projections as a supporting measure for other operations may be advisable. A chain of small islands offers certain advantages as a landing area. The delivery of naval gunfire, particularly counterbattery, is facilitated, and the operation may be conducted step by step, each island as it is seized becoming a base for further operations.

The islands may be mutually supporting by small-arms or artillery fire, but the employment of general reserves by the defender for opposing the landings on the various islands may be difficult or entirely impossible. The time element, therefore, is important in the selection of the landing area. If time is limited it may be necessary to land close to the objective regardless of enemy dispositions.

With more time available, the landing may be made in an area where the beaches are less heavily defended, but requiring more extensive shore operations for the carrying out of the mission. Operations that may be feasible at one season of the year may be impracticable at another due to weather conditions, such as prevalent high winds which may render landings impossible, the likelihood of storms interrupting ship to shore communications, or rains rendering land operations difficult.

Surf and reefs may be negotiable at only one stage of the tide and conditions may vary within the same general area. Landing areas having the best beaches and the most favorable approaches inland will probably be those most heavily defended by the enemy. Conversely, landing areas with unfavorable beaches and easily defended avenues of approach inland will be less heavily defended. The final selection of the landing area will generally be a question of deciding between these conflicting conditions.

A correct decision demands a careful estimate of the situation, involving not only a study of the physical features of the beaches but a thorough knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of the opposing forces and a careful computation of time and space. As a rule sufficient information on which to base a decision will not be available until after a thorough reconnaissance has been completed. Frontage of attack 15 Boats 16 Hostile dispositions 16 Types of landings 16 Illustrative diagrams–Scheme of maneuver An important consideration in formulating a scheme of maneuver is the frontage to be covered by the landings and the subsequent advance inland.

Necessarily, the frontage of the landing is dependent, to a large extent, upon the number, type, and relative position of the beaches available in the landing area. An almost equally important consideration, however, is the strength and equipment of the attacking force. During the initial stages of the landing, ships’ guns constitute the artillery of the attacking force. This force must be considered therefore, as comprising two elements of major importance, namely -.

It is desirable to attack on a wide front in order to increase the speed of landing and to cause a dispersion of the defender’s efforts, but the attacking force must not itself overextend. It must observe the principle of concentration of effort and assign sufficient forces to the various tasks to insure their success. Units comprising initial assault echelons are particularly apt to become disorganized during and immediately after the landing, and they cannot be expected to make deep penetrations against strong opposition.

It is often desirable, therefore, to have leading assault units secure a limited objective or intermediate beachhead and cover the landing of fresh troops with which to carry on the attack. In many cases landings will not be made on the entire front of the beachhead. This will result in the zone of attack increasing in width as the advance inland progresses. The scheme of maneuver, therefore, must provide for the introduction of additional units in the assault from time to time in order to take care of this increased front.

Sufficient reserves must be kept in hand to insure the exploitation of successes and to continue the attack to the final objective. But an operation which apparently requires all of the attacker’s forces for securing the initial foothold on the beach is rarely justified.

The foregoing factors require organization in depth, and units should be assigned frontages which permit a depth of formation commensurate with the effort expected of them; that is, according to the depth of advance, the nature of the hostile opposition, and the assistance to be expected from or given to neighboring units.

Consideration must be given not only to the frontage of the landing but to the frontage to be eventually covered by the unit. Probably the most difficult decision in formulating the scheme of maneuver is that pertaining to the frontage which can be effectively covered by the fire of the available ships, and it is here that the judgment and responsibility of the commander is put to the severest test.

In deciding this question, consideration must be given to: First, the devastating effect of the fire of relatively few machine guns when firing under advantageous conditions; second, that an attack against such weapons has little chance of success unless adequately supported by artillery; third, that a landing operation cannot be stopped and resumed at will, and, as a rule, only one chance for success is offered.

In order to provide this essential artillery support, the scheme of maneuver must observe the principle of concentration of effort for the naval gunfire as well as for the landing force, by limiting the landings to frontages commensurate with the amount of supporting gunfire available. Where the number of ships is relatively small, two alternate maneuvers are offered for accomplishing the desired results, namely -.

Landing at few beaches. Landing at several beaches in echelon, so that all available ships can concentrate successively on each beach. The speed with which troops can be put ashore is directly dependent upon the number and type of boats available and the distance of the transports from the various beaches.

The scheme of maneuver, therefore, must take these factors into consideration, particularly where there are not enough boats to embark all of the landing force at one time. The timely support of assault echelons and the prompt exploitation of success require reserves in boats immediately available. This limits the number of boats, and consequently the troops and frontages, which can be assigned the initial assault echelons. The frontage of the initial attack will also be limited by the availability of small, fast boats suitable for assault troops.

Such boats should be provided for the leading platoons of battalions which are to be landed in assault. For detailed discussion of landing boats, see Ch. Beaches strongly organized for defense should be avoided, if possible, in the initial landings.

Advantage should be taken of undefended or lightly defended portions of the shore line, even though presenting less favorable landing conditions, in order to outmaneuver the hostile resistance or to gain a position from which flanking artillery or small-arms fire may be brought to assist the landing at more favorable beaches. This type of maneuver may necessitate awaiting favorable weather conditions in order to effect landings at the desired beaches. It should be recognized that such plans embody additional hazards due to probable delays in execution, and the consequent increased danger of interruption of operations by bad weather or submarine attack.

A simultaneous landing may be made on all selected landing beaches, or the landing may be made by echelon. In attacking by echelon, it is generally desirable to land last at the beach, or beaches, where it is planned to make the main effort. This enables the ships which support that landing to continue, without interruption, in support of the advance of the main effort.

Plans must be flexible, however, and constant consideration should be given to the advisability of exploiting a landing already successfully executed rather than attempting a new landing against opposition. The time interval between landings, in an attack by echelon, may vary between wide limits. Where there are sufficient boats to carry all of the landing force in one trip and the supporting ships can cover the various landings from the same general locality, this interval may be only a few minutes.

The amount of ships’ gunfire to be placed on the various beaches, together with the scheme of maneuver on shore, will determine this time interval. Where two or more boat trips and considerable movement of the supporting ships are required, or where it is desired to cause a movement of hostile reserves toward the first landing, several hours may elapse between landings.

The danger of being defeated in detail must be guarded against. Landings by echelon should be attempted only when the beaches, or groups of beaches, are separated by such distances that troops landed on one beach will not be endangered by naval gunfire on another beach. A landing by echelon, as in a landing on a single beach, facilitates the concentration of the hostile artillery fires. In connection with such landings, demonstrations should be made to cause a dispersion of the hostile fire.

In addition heavy counterbattery fire should be employed to neutralize the enemy batteries. The following figures illustrate diagrammatically the application of the foregoing principles in the formulation of a scheme of maneuver for a landing operation under varying conditions as to number of beaches and form of coast line. The diagrams are intended merely to illustrate general principles under certain conditions. In actual practice, these conditions may be encountered in a variety of forms and in an infinite number of combinations.

The broken lines in the diagrams are not necessarily objectives, but indicate simply how the maneuver may develop on shore. The actual location of objectives is dependent upon the contemplated maneuver on shore, the nature of the terrain, speed of landing, and the probable rate of advance.

The arrows in the diagrams indicate the direction of the main effort, that is, the direction in which the commander plans to exert the maximum effort in the accomplishment of the particular task in view. This is a general direction only; diverging local maneuvers are often necessary by subordinate commanders, and all local successes should be vigorously exploited.

Figure 3 illustrates a landing and demonstrations, with a possible maneuver on shore, when the terrain, amount of naval gunfire, or hostile dispositions make it desirable to limit the landings to one beach, or to a few adjacent beaches. This maneuver has the advantage of simplicity in the execution of the movement from ships to shore and permits the concentration of ships in support of the one landing.

This type of landing, however, enables the enemy to concentrate his artillery on the landing, facilitates the employment of hostile reserves, and entails the maximum extension of front after the landing is effected. Heavy counterbattery and interdiction fires should be employed in connection with such landings. The demonstrations at C and D may be employed with any of the illustrations which follow. Demonstrations, made on the flanks of a landing, are desirable in order to disperse the enemy artillery fire and to confuse the enemy as to the actual point of landing.

Reconnaissance of adjacent beaches may be conducted in connection with such demonstrations. This maneuver is a modification of that shown in figure 3. It illustrates the capture by flanking action of a beach which is strongly defended or difficult of approach from seaward. Initial landings are made at A and B, which have better approaches, are more difficult to defend, or, on account of unfavorable landing conditions, are less strongly held than C. After the capture of C, landings may be continued at that beach, the troops landed at C being used to push the attack in the desired direction.

The A massive bronze door surmounted by an American eagle leads into the chapel, whose outer walls contain sculptured pieces of military equipment and the names of missing soldiers. By the end of the 19th century, the Navy adopted regulations for proper observance of Decoration Day to be held on May In , Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. For details email doc ascnapoli. Naples Military Hog Chapter Seeking New Members Attention Motorcycle Riders: The Naples Military Hog Chapter invites you to see the wonders of Italy and beyond the borders on two wheels with friends and there are no better friends than the Naples Military Hog Chapter, we are a family friendly organization that offers plenty for everyone.

So whether you ride a sport bike, Triumph, Victory, Indian, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki or Harley come to a monthly meeting and see if these adventures are for you.

The riding season is opening and the summers rallies, rides and events are being discussed. The Uniform Locker is located on board Capodichino in Bldg.

The Naples Middle High School PTSA is looking for volunteers to help provide information, resources and events that strengthen the connections between students, parents, the school and the community. Boy Scout Troop holds troop meetings every Monday from 6 to p. For details email scoutmastertroop gmail. Girl Scouts Overseas Naples is excited to support young leaders in action.

We are much more than cookies; we show girls how to contribute positively in this world. From arts and crafts to camping trips and more Naples Girl Scouts wants girls to be have fun learning. We normally convene every other week on Wednesdays, alternating between Support Site and Capodichino. For details visit www.

Practice is every Wednesday at 6 p. Little, PG 6 p. The Curse of La Llorona, R 9 p. Ugly Dolls, PG 4 p. Aladdin, PG p. The Intruder, PG p. Long Shot, R Sunday, June 2 3 p. Ugly Dolls, PG 6 p. Breakthrough, PG 7 p. Hellboy, R Thursday, June 6 5 p. Ugly Dolls, PG p. Little, PG 7 p. Saving Private Ryan, R p. Long Shot, R. A kindhearted street urchin and a power-hungry Grand Vizier vie for a magic lamp that has the power to make their deepest wishes come true.

Breakthrough PG, Biography-Drama, min. When her year-old son drowns in a lake, a faithful mother prays for him to come back from the brink of death and be healed. Ignoring the eerie warning of a troubled mother suspected of child endangerment, a social worker and her own small kids are soon drawn into a frightening supernatural realm. The crypto-zoological agency Monarch faces off against a battery of god-sized monsters, including the mighty Godzilla, who collides with Mothra, Rodan, and his ultimate nemesis, the three-headed King Ghidorah.

Based on the graphic novels by Mike Mignola, Hellboy, caught between the worlds of the supernatural and human, battles an ancient sorceress bent on revenge. A young married couple buy a beautiful house on several acres of land. A woman is transformed into her younger self at a point in her life when the pressures of adulthood become too much to bear. When Fred Flarsky reunites with his first crush, one of the most influential women in the world, Charlotte Field, he charms her.

As she prepares to make a run for the Presidency, Charlotte hires Fred as her speechwriter and sparks fly. In a world where people collect Pokemon to do battle, a boy comes across an intelligent talking Pikachu who seeks to be a detective.

Following the Normandy Landings, a group of U. An animated adventure in which the freespirited Ugly Dolls confront what it means to be different, struggle with a desire to be loved, and ultimately discover who you truly are is what matters most. If you have been sexually assaulted or need to speak with a S.

The DoD Safe Helpline can be reached toll-free at For details call or visit www. Harry S Truman Lodge No. For details call Chris Gerbore at or email gerborechris hotmail. Women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, postpartum or have an infant or child under the age of five may qualify for the program. WIC Overseas is a nutrition education program that provides nutritious supplemental foods.

For deails call The Naples Area Second Class Petty Officer Association meets every other Tuesday in the Capodichino Theater at noon to discuss upcoming community outreach opportunities and charity events. For details email Dana Eberlin at kofcnaples gmail. Training and support provided. For details email naplesgs yahoo. Connect the Tots is an organization for bringing together families with babies and toddlers to play and mingle.

Monthly club events include themed parties, group outings off-base and playground meet-ups. Child care provided. We also meet Wednesdays at a. For details email cwocnaples gmail. Filipino-American Association of Naples, Italy meets at 5 p.

For details email michael. The U. The Naples Christian Homeschool Association meets every month to support families who have chosen to educate their own children. Meditation Sitting Group meets on Mondays begins at 6 p.

Participation is free and newcomers are welcome. For details call the Chapel at DSN University of Oklahoma Graduate Degrees The University of Oklahoma offers the master of human relations on-site graduate degree program. Courses meet in a series of four evenings and one weekend. Register For On-Site Undergraduate Classes Visit the colleges for more information about what classes and programs are offered. Naples Area Nurses Association NANA is an organization of nurses that work together to fundraise, participate in social events, and provide support throughout the U.

For details email Lt. Rhys Parker at rhys. Security Note: All DoD military or civilian personnel hosting an event off base must complete a Special Event Force Protection Plan SEFPP 45 days in advance, regardless of organization, if the event will involve 50 or more personnel, include distinguished visitors or involve personnel wearing uniforms. The CPGA provides weekly social activities for all levels of golfer and often organize trips to other courses. Events are held every Saturday and Sunday.

For details call For eligible children who have not reached their third birthday. Cub Scout Pack Does your son enjoy being outdoors, going on hikes, swimming and camping?

The Naples Cub Scouts is an active program that is open to boys between kindergarten and fifth grade. Meetings and activities are three times per month. For details email naplescubmaster gmail. A move overseas requires months of planning and preparation. Photo by Gary Nichols. To reduce the up-front financial burden, Sailors are encouraged to request applicable advance travel entitlements that vary depending on whether the PCS is within the continental U.

The options include dislocation allowance DLA , monetary allowance in lieu of transportation MALT for mileage reimbursement, per diem for military member and dependents, and lodging and per diem expenses during training en route. This provides a modern and simplified means for Sailors to manage their PCS move on a mobile device.

Additionally, efforts are underway to gain approval to provide Sailors the full entitlement rates up-front for PCS moves. The Boys and Girls Club of America BCGA supports the annual Military Youth of the Year program, recognizing and honoring the community service, academic success, character, and citizenship of military connected students through our military Youth Centers worldwide.

A local level competition is held each year, to select outstanding teens in the Naples Child and Youth Programs Teen Center. The National Youth of the Year is the top honor a club member can receive. This distinction of excellence is awarded scholarships at the state, regional, and national level. The Keystone club participation has risen significantly, and they have tirelessly run community service projects including, peer and middle school mentorship, Christmas Cookies for Sailors Drive, base cleanup days, sports ceremony recognitions, Civil Rights activities with younger students, and much more.

Customer service operation hours for the following services are Monday, Wednesday and Friday from a. This method increases the security of the USAJOBS system and allows individuals to use a single sign in for multiple government systems. Applicants, who have not created a login.

Once registered, you may customize your job searches, set up job alerts and store your resume and other essential employment documents online and be ready to apply for a job anytime. The customer service hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 8 a.

Thusday from to 3 p. The CHR Office must receive mailed applications by closing date of the vacancy announcement. If you have any questions, contact the front desk at DSN or Comm.

You will be contacted within 24 hours, so please be sure to provide your contact information. Thank you and we appreciate your input, whether negative or positive so that we can find ways to improve the CHR services, or continue to provide excellent service.

Please feel free to come by, pick up a copy of a vacancy announcement that you may be interested in applying for, or ask questions. The applications may be emailed to NAFPersonnel eu. Job Summary: The purpose of the CYP Assistant is to provide appropriate developmental care and instruction for children and youth ranging in age from six weeks to 18 years in one or more CY programs.

Closing Date: June 4, The purpose of this position is to provide professional support to the comprehensive program of recreational Fleet and Family Readiness opportunities for U. Closing Date: June 5, Job Summary: Performs. Closing Date: June 12, NEX U. For a current list of U. You will see all the jobs in Italy mostly Naples area ; just make sure you are NOT applying for a position located in Sigonella Sicily.

For any questions or concerns please call the numbers above.

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